Friday, October 30, 2009

Sketchup Model References

Swimming Pool “Swimming Hole” Swing Accessory, by John in Paisley:
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=d062d6f0f1ea43ca588242301029786e&prevstart=12

Ladder, by by qsymq:
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=43fd5e623193883aea206a79f4ae235&prevstart=0

Monkey Ladder, by by draftsman:
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=692baf4b62916765b7588693444ba42f

Water Closet Stalls Dynamic DC, by Phillip John Caudle:
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=e358c80b605471e2ca27da2b5ef0c87a&prevstart=0

Wash Basin Stalls Dynamic DC, by Phillip John Caudle:
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=2973c8df1f11d342ca27da2b5ef0c87a&ct=mdrm&prevstart=0

Shower Stalls Dynamic DC , by Phillip John Caudle:
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=cfcbbe60baf7c952ca27da2b5ef0c87a&ct=mdrm&prevstart=0

Final Poster Submission




The initial PDF (animation enabled version) can be downloaded from: http://www.filefront.com/14837369/mostIMPORTANTfile.pdf






The final PDF (animation enabled version) can be downloaded from: http://www.filefront.com/14837355/3292108_JenniferLynnSalcedo_Assignment%202.pdf




The final PDF (print version) can be downloaded from: http://www.filefront.com/14837309/3292108_JenniferLynnSalcedo_PrintVersion

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Drafts and Development of my envision



























Modelling

500 word text

Inspired by the Roman Bathes in Bath, the Gehry Recreational Waterhouse, also
known as ‘the giant’s flooded dollhouse’, is a building which begs a large gasp
of air. The focus for the renvision of the Vitra Design Museum is flow and fish.
The main design reflects a collaboration of works by renowned deconstractionalist architect, Frank Gehry. These works include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, his fish sculptures, The Museum of Contemporary Arts in LA, Layola Law School in LA, and Reception Center in Columbia for example.

The large structure reaches depths of 3380mm and can occupy the size of an
entire school. To emphasise the grandness of the architecture; upon entering a
translucent tiles wall instantly blocks a straight path and instead leads into
two directions, curving either to the left or to the right. The narrow corridor
it offers is greatly emphasised as it at a mere 2 metres wide. After the tight
welcoming, the complex offers large open waterspace, where means of travel may
only be achieved by swimming. The facility includes 5 main swimming spaces, with
2 waterfall-like features and a fountain; 2 sets of bathrooms and changerooms; a
spiral waterslide; various holes, ladders and stairs which lead to different
spaces; and a rope swing.


Like the original Guggenheim Musuem in Bilbao, this
structure is constructed with the combinations of concrete walls, steel roofing
and glass for its exterior. The waterhouse is also materialised by marble,
translucent glass tiles and sandy concrete. For most of the interior, the
building is covered in ceramic tiles, much like Hearst Castle in
California.


The Tilted Staircase
At first glance, the building itself is
unusual and obscure, and when entering the building this concept is again
reassured. In a combined collaboration of the Gehry buildings: the Reception
Center and the Dancing building, this staircase is reminiscent of a tilted
staircase. Each step is adjusted 100mm to either its left or right respective to
its initial step. Walking up the staircase, the steps lead towards the right,
with the thicker balustrades to the right also. Once at the landing, the stairs
continue up to the main entrance leaning in the opposite direction, where the
balustrades on the right change to a thinner one, to provided a distorted
allusion.


Fishbone and twisted ladders
Toward the right of the complex, a
set of four rooms are assembled with three doorways. Two of the four fours
unusually allow access by swimming below the water level and through a hole. The
fourth room is only accessible by climbing up a twisted ladder embedded in a
ceramic tile-covered concrete wall. The ladder leads up to a hole which from
afar makes the entire system appear as a string of DNA. Being Gehry
inspired, the building could not stray away from fish inspired design. Thus, one
of the four rooms also includes a wall ladder – in the shape of a
fishbone. This ladder leads to an opening to the next space which includes
a rope swing, which also happens to be the deepest space in the entire building
(whilst the entrance remains the most shallow)

Backbone Structure
When in back of the waterhouse, the roofing is more varied and of different form. Whilst all the other spaces have flatter roofs, the waterslide space has a curved roof
and is made of glass with steel framing. The framing is inspired by backbone
sculptures like the Flux and Gehry’s fish lamp; and architecture such as the Ian
Thorpe aquatic center and the Liege-Guillemins Railway station. This concept was
implemented into the design as it reflected both the concepts of flow and fish.



Draft Renders (still in modelling process)






Draft Animation



Draft Poster

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

VDM Recreational Waterhouse: Modifications, Precedents, Details.

Below are extracts and collections of ideas, designs, quotes and other various forms of research which explore styles and precedents for my envision of the current Vitra Design Museum.


WATER CONCEPT

  • In conjunction with direction from my tutor, the following buildings and locations have provided great precedence for my envision, and thus has influenced most of its design.

- Venetian Hotel, Las Vegas

Source: http://www.myrealvegas.com/shopping/grand-canal-shoppes-venetian-las-vegas.htm
- Csaszar Baths (Turkish Baths), Budapest, HungarySource: http://baths.topbudapest.org/
- Roman Bathes, BathSource: http://hypnotictherapy.o,%20bathrg/page2.htm
- Hearst Castle Indoor Pool, San Simeon, CaliforniaSource: http://www.mccullagh.org/image/d30-26/hearst-castle-interior-swimming-pool.html Source: http://photos.igougo.com/pictures-photos-p103773-Hearst_Castle_inner_pool.html

STRUCTURAL STYLES

see Inspirational Montage for Leisure Center concept

GEOMETRICAL SHAPES
  • I intend to use the following quote as the precendent for the internal shapes and design style in my recreating of the vitra design museum space.
"Marvelously, and inimitatbly, [Gehry] has managed to infuse his buildings with those qualities of immediacy, sponteity and improvisational gusto that we customarily encounter only in works of art that have come directly from the hand of the artist."
Source: Cobb, H.N., Bletter, R.H., van Braggen [et.al] 1986, The Architecture of Frank Gehry, Rizzoli International Publications, New York. p.7
  • Futher ideas for geometrical shapes within my envision are as follows:

- The Musuem of Contemporary Arts, LA [image]
Source: Cobb, H.N., Bletter, R.H., van Braggen [et.al] 1986, The Architecture of Frank Gehry, Rizzoli International Publications, New York. p. 187

-Winton Guest House, Wayzata, Minnesota [image]

Source: Cobb, H.N., Bletter, R.H., van Braggen [et.al] 1986, The Architecture of Frank Gehry, Rizzoli International Publications, New York. p.203

STAIRCASE

  • Inspiration of a non-straight and non-direct staircase arrive from:

- Loyola Law School, The Fritz B. Burns Student Center, LA, California [image] & [image]

Source: Cobb, H.N., Bletter, R.H., van Braggen [et.al] 1986, The Architecture of Frank Gehry, Rizzoli International Publications, New York. p.170

Source: Dal Co, F., Forester, K.W. & Arnold, H. 2003, Frank Gehry: the complete works, Monacelli Press, Milano. p196-7

- Reception Center, Columbia, Maryland [image]

The above buildings are inspirations to my envision of the current Vitra Design Museum as it evidently demonstrates Gehry's architectural style to create disturbance and imbalances in his staircases. The staircase of these particular buildings, along with other designs, show that Gehry chooses to create unusual staircases, as opposed to straight, plain and traditional ones.

Source: Dal Co, F., Forester, K.W. & Arnold, H. 2003, Frank Gehry: the complete works, Monacelli Press, Milano. p83


  • Tilted staircase. My envision for a staircase that appears to tilt or appear obscure have been derived from the following Gehry building:

- Nationale-Nederlanden Building, Prague, Czech Republic [image]

Source: Dal Co, F., Forester, K.W. & Arnold, H. 2003, Frank Gehry: the complete works, Monacelli Press, Milano. p505-7

- Hollywood Sign, Barcelona, Spain [image] page 389

Source: Dal Co, F., Forester, K.W. & Arnold, H. 2003, Frank Gehry: the complete works, Monacelli Press, Milano. p389

The above are works of particular interest to myself. Personally intruiged by the concept and style, I have decided to somewhat incoporate this style into my design.

  • The combination of the two gathered points and the following building have helped me to arrive with the conclusive staircase design for my envision.

- Information and Computer Science/Engineering Laboratory and Engineering Center, University of California, Irvine, California [image]

Source: Dal Co, F., Forester, K.W. & Arnold, H. 2003, Frank Gehry: the complete works, Monacelli Press, Milano. p281

Concept Development: Recreational Waterhouse

Further Development on Leisure Center concept to Recreational Waterhouse concept
In conjunction with my tutors help, I have further developed my concept so that it no longer serves as an all rounder leisure center, but instead focuses on only one aspect of my original leisure center. The swimming pool will now be the central inspiration for my new development. The entire current Vitra Design Museum will be filled with water so that it functions like an indoor pool or like the bathes in Bath, where the space can be explored by swimming to various areas of the building.


150 words describing my envision

Drawing in inspiration from locations and concepts such as the bathes in Bath, Hearst castle’s indoor pool, and with my tutor’s help, a glass of water, I have come to a conclusion on my final envision for the current Vitra Design Museum. Like traditional swimming pool, I intend to fill the entire Vitra Design Museum with water so that the entire space does not house a swimming pool, but is in fact a swimming pool. In order to experience the space, a person must swim through the building as opposed to walking. Logically, the design will include change rooms. Architecturally, the exterior structure will remain as it is, however the interior will see additions such as geometrical solids and elevations randomly placed throughout, as well as ladders and holes to travel between rooms. The geographical location of my envisioned recreational waterhouse would remain the same – in Germany. I also intend to emulate the material choice of Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim museum, i.e. steel, glass, concrete etc. Other architectural precedents for my envision include, the vertebrae sculpture for structure, Guadalajara Library for its creative use of cylinders, Roma Mitchell Commonwealth Law Courts for contrasting of materials etc. As I have made numerous concept changes, I also intend to implement similar ideas from my initial envisions. Such as including concepts of transparency and lighting in my church concept, and scaling the building up in my leisure center concept.

CONCEPT FOUR:
Site context - Current
Structural changes - Internal additions, Scaling, none to external structure
Function - Recreational Waterhouse
Materiality - like Guggenheim, variations of either, glass, concrete, steel, limestone and titaium; most likely glass, concrete and steel (external). Also, ceramic tiles, glass, concrete (internal).

CONCEPT MONTAGE
The below image is a montage of my water concept

Image captions and sources:

note: this concept montage is in conjunction with the initial leisure center inspirational montage


A3 Inspirational Montage


The file can also be downloaded from: http://www.filefront.com/14763731/3292108_finalmontage_recreationalwaterhouse.pdf

The above montage summarises the structural, materialistic and conceptual ideals for my envision

Source:

Friday, October 16, 2009

Peer Review: Cameron Gage and Koray Altiparmak

Koray Altiparmak, By Jennifer Salcedo


Cameron Gage, By Jennifer Salcedo