Wednesday, October 14, 2009

More Research on Frank Gehry

FURTHER RESEARCH on FRANK GEHRY'S ARCHITECTURAL STYLE

  • Summary of research about Gehry's renown style of architecture and description of his works
    - Highly expressive
    - Known for his unconventional uses of materials, exposed studs and unexpected collisions of forms and techniques
    - Whilst he may be a famous Modernist architect, he is not a post-modernist architect. Conversely, his work cannot be categorized as either post modernist or modernist.
    - Gehry uses historical allusions in his work, primarily in symbolic references as opposed to direct stylistic quotation
    - His works can be described as a collection of "volumetric objects"
    - Renown for his aesthetic vision and collaborations with artists as well as his original thinking within the traditional vocabulary of architecture.
    - Gehry first gained national attention, not through his architecture, but his furniture. Thus, "if furniture was no longer an extension of a building, some of his buildings became, instead, large pieces of furniture." p.76
    - Where many architects used classical buildings as references for their work, Gehry turned to nature for forms.
    - Commonly exposed the structure make up of his buildings; this concept was based on Gehry ideal that buildings looked better "unfinished" (during his 1970-early1980 career) p.159
    - By mid 1980s, exposed wood studs, chain-link fencing and transparent layers of skeletal wall appeared less and less in Gehry's designs.
    - For most of Gehry's later career, he was highly intruiged by collision buildings; where finished shapes (recoginzable, geometric solids and abstracted in form)collide to form a single sculptural object. However, this concept was never new to him prior to this period.
    - During his "collision period" Gehry was also more focused in landscape buildings (compared to pre mid1980s); where traditionally single rooms were arranged to appear dettached and in a village like composition.

Source: Cobb, H.N., Bletter, R.H., van Braggen [et.al] 1986, The Architecture of Frank Gehry, Rizzoli International Publications, New York.

  • Futher supporting research on Gehry's architectural style

  • - Described as a pioneer in abstract architecture and known to be fond of fragmented forms. His collection of works are full of visual tensions and ambiguities. With angles planes and tilting formations, alongside an obscure combination of materials; he also, by design, shares knowledge on its assembly processes. In a sense, he takes abstract sculpturing and make it habitable.
Source: Curtis. W. J.R. 2007, Modern Architecture Since 1900, Phaidon Press Limited, London. p.662

      • Architectural Transitions were very evident in Gehry's career. The digitalised model segement of this is explored below:

      • - Described as a pioneer in abstract architecture and known to be fond of fragmented forms. His collection of works are full of visual tensions and ambiguities. With angles planes and tilting formations, alongside an obscure combination of materials; he also, by design, shares knowledge on its assembly processes. In a sense, he takes abstract sculpturing and make it habitable

      Source: Lindsey, B. 2001, Digital Gehry: Material resistance Digital Construction, Birkhauser, Basel, Switzerland

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